Monday, August 17, 2009

Whew! It Was a Hot One this Weekend!

Temperatures have been in the 80-90s over the last few days. Hey, stop laughing! I know to most of you who live south of us this is nothing compared to the temperatures you have to deal with. But we are not used to this in Maine and after the awful summer we have had, this is just HIT. We spent the weekend mostly inside with air conditioning.

This weekend was similar to last in that I canned beans (10 pints), baked a couple zucchini breads, and dried parsley. I waited until late Sunday afternoon so the air conditioners could cool the house down afterwards.



I had a bunch of zucchini to grate up, place in freezer bags, and freeze for baking in the future. That big one in the back got away from me. I never saw it until it was huge! I had to scoop the seeds out before grating, but it will be fine for baking.


The bush beans are still producing a colander full of beans each day. The pole beans are almost ready for their first picking in spite of the Japanese Beetle damage to their leaves:


I cut into one of the two mutant cucumbers this weekend and not surprisingly, it was bitter. Both this one and its partner went into the compost pile.


Speaking of mutants, I found this yellow summer squash today. It looks like two fruits fused together when growing:


The peppers absolutely love this hot weather. It’s like they are saying, finally:




I’ll have to see if the farmer’s markets around me had better luck with tomatoes, as I really wanted to make a bunch of salsa from the garden this year.

The lettuce, peas, and spinach that I planted last weekend sprouted. I only hope they survive the heat wave we are experiencing.




It is interesting how quickly the lettuce, spinach, and peas sprouted. When seeded in early spring, I had difficulty getting the seeds to germinate and when they did, often times the young seedlings were inundated with aphids. There seems to be no aphids in the garden right now.

7 comments:

  1. Those are some nice looking vegetables you have there. The squash just looks plain weird! Oh well, it'll still be yummy!

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  2. I'm always surprised how insect free my fall crops are compared to the damage done in the spring. I have gorgeous beet greens right now, and not a sign of leaf miners. I haven't even seen an earwig lately, and I was inundated with them earlier.

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  3. I have a fused pumpkin like that too! It is the oddest looking thing - like siamese twin pumpkins. I need to post a pic of it on my blog soon.

    Glad you are getting some summer weather - kick starting those heat loving crops.

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  4. @EG, Thanks! The squash surprised me with its strangeness.

    @AG: I never considered fall crops before, I think I am going to like how insect free they seem to be.

    @kitsapFG, I WOULD like to see the pumpkin! It's strange what happens sometimes. Yes, the warm weather is great for the garden. I can see large growth every day.

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  5. GrafixMuse - I posted a pic of that pumpkin on tonight's blog entry. It's pretty strange looking! You can check it out here:

    http://www.modernvictorygarden.com/apps/blog/show/1599797-firewood-mutant-pumpkins

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  6. Oh how funny.I had a squash just like that this week!

    Every two days I have to can beans. They trickle in about 8 quarts at a time and I have 112 bushes of blue lakes. They just arent producing as heavily as I would like. The plants are gorgeous but I think I planted them too close because they get beans around the outside and the top but the inside is pretty much just thick leaves.

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  7. @kitsapFG: OMG twins! That's so strange. Looks like you will have two edible pumpkins out it that mutation.

    @Mrs. Darling: I hope your beans pick up in production soon. You got me thinking about how many plants I actually have of beans. Mine too are planted pretty close together, each row has a double row of beans about 3-inches apart. So I am guessing I probably have about 350 plants or so combined. The three rows of Tendergold, Royal Burgundy, and Blue Lake have been producing for a few weeks. The Kentucky Wonder pole beans just started producing a few handfuls this week. I expect this to increase now until frost. I planted double what I planted last year as we ran out of canned beans by February.

    BTW, I took a peek at your blog and now I am tempted to make Garden Relish. I don’t even think I LIKE relish, but it looked so good.

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