Monday, February 15, 2010

Update on the Onions: Week 1

I love the way onions emerge from the soil. They break through the soil with an elbow or knee first, then straighten out and stretch upwards towards the light.

I moved the onions from the salad trays to a regular flat over the weekend. The humidity dome was removed today.


Copra Onions are on the left side:


Patterson Onions are on the right:


So far they seem to be growing at the same rate even though the Copra sprouted one day before the Patterson.

I tested the Evergreen Bunching Onion seeds to see if they would sprout by sprinkling them on a wet coffee filter, folding it in quarters, and placing it in a zipper bag. The seeds are old and as suspected, never sprouted. So I am planting more Copra and Patterson Onions instead thinking they can be harvested early like I would scallions.

Some of you warned me that seed starting was addicting. I couldn’t help myself and planted some lettuce, parsley, spinach and cilantro over the weekend since I have the space.

10 comments:

  1. "planted some lettuce, parsley, spinach and cilantro over the weekend"

    Oh, goody! You can be our test subject for moon planting. According to Farmer's Almanac...

    February 13th-15th. Barren Days. Fine For Clearing, Plowing, Fertilizing, And Killing Plant Pests.

    February 16th-17th. Plant Above Ground Crops.

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  2. Oh this is just the beginning... :-)

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  3. Onions really are a fun plant to watch emerge and grow on. I happen to really like onions (can anyone really cook much of anything without onions?!) so I am doubly rewarded by watching their happy growth and from the eventual harvest.

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  4. Oh Granny! I was hoping no one would notice. They are just small batches, so we will see. I’ll be sure to update their progress.

    Liisa: It IS just the beginning, but I already see how fun this is.

    KitsapFG: I cook with a lot of onions. I had to purchase some from the grocery store this weekend. All I could think was hopefully next year at this time I will be eating my own stored onions.

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  5. I can't believe how much faster your onions have grown compared to mine. I really should have had them over a heating mat. Their growth seems nicely uniform as well.

    I've decided to wintersow my remaining onion seeds...no reason to have them go to waste, right?

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  6. I don't know anyone except for Mr. H. who grows enough onions, but it's one of my dreams.
    Have you seen people clip the tops of their onions in flats? Do you know why they do that?

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  7. Thomas: I think the quick growth is from the heating mat. They are now off the heating mat and on their own. I bet yours will catch up quickly as my basement is colder than yours.

    Stefaneener: I use a lot of onions, so I should plan on growing as many as possible for summer use and winter storage.

    Yes, I have seen onions with haircuts. I think it is to keep them under control while they are under the lights. Otherwise they may get too tall for the lights and may flop over. I have also read that it helps produce thicker stems and encourage root growth. I plan on clipping the tops of the onions to keep them at 4-inches. The cuttings can be added to salads.

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  8. Yes, isn't it amazing the way alliums sprout, bent over like that. I love it !

    Looking good, GM ! And your blocks seem to be holding up great ! They've even survived a move ? Wow, soil blocks are sturdier than I thought !

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  9. Miss M: The soil block transfer went quite well. They are quite compressed, so I think they will hold up well until the roots break them down a bit.

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  10. congrats on your new onion babies! your soil blocks look fabulous as well. i just got around to seeding my cipollinis, shallots and leeks yesterday. last year i grew all my onions from seed and finally had some really good success. this year i'll be doing both seeds and sets just for giggles.

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