Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Onions Transplanted

Green is bursting out all around the yard and garden after this weekends rain. We gave the lawn its first mow of the season and I will need to trim the paths between the garden beds soon.



Onion, Leek, and Celery seedlings have been hardening off for the past few weeks. I was waiting for the expected rain before transplanting them to the garden.

Now that the ground was damp from the rain this past weekend, the onions were the first to go in. I mass plant my onion seeds to save room under the lights.

To plant, I remove them carefully from the container:



Most times the root all breaks apart like shown above. If the onions were more densely seeded in the containers, the roots would have held the soil together more firmly. Now, I gently tease them apart for planting. I do this one at a time so the roots don't dry out.


I use a fork or small tool to pull the soil forward, place the onion seedling in the hole, and gently push back the soil. No patting or tamping in. 

Pull the soil forward

Place the onion seedling in the hole.

Gently push the soil back.

When the onion seedlings are transplanted, the bed is softly watered in. 


9 comments:

  1. I do mine in individual blocks and they take up a ton of space under my lights.

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    1. I planted onions in blocks my first year. I only have the 2-inch soil block maker and they took up a whole shelf under the lights. I've been mass planting them ever since to save room.

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  2. The onion seedlings look good and your mass planting approach really does save space. I used to do it that way and have gone to individual blocks and it is using up way too much of my grow light growing room so I think I may have to switch back in 2013.

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    1. The soil blocks are probably easier to plant and don't disturb the seedling's growth, but the space under the lights was a huge issue for me. Mass planting seems to work ok.

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  3. Sounds like the way to do it.
    I'm still buying seedlings. I've got to change that next year.
    Looks like you'll have a fine crop.

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    1. I look forward to growing onions from seed each year because they are the first things I sow for the upcoming garden season. They allow me to do a little gardening while winter carries on outside.

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  4. They look great. I bet it's fun watching them perk up and make it their own space as they put down new roots. It's the way I do it (and most nurseries, too).

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    1. I am sure the onions are happy to stretch their roots a bit. Hopefully they will like their new home and size up nicely.

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  5. My onion seeds came up for the first time and the plants are doing well. Thanks the tutorial on transplanting I will need to do that soon.

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