Wednesday, May 1, 2013

Productive Weekend

I spent most of Saturday in my home office working on a graphic design project with a tight deadline. I've been buried in this project for a while and it was nearing conclusion. A last minute change required extra effort and it was necessary to step up my pace and work swiftly. I stared at my monitor; my fingers danced through the keys and swept the mouse back and forth. Instinct allowed me to be quick and efficient at manipulating images and text into an orderly and pleasant to read document.

I would glance up from time to time to gaze out the window. It was a beautiful day outside. Just the day I've been yearning for, warm and sunny. The window was open and allowed fresh air and the sounds of the birds to fill the room. My mind wandered to all the things that needed tending to such as sifting the rest of the compost, planting the potatoes, and preparing the garden beds. Then an alarm in my mind would ring, "deadline!" and wake me up from my daydream. With a refreshed view, I returned to the project again.

I finished the project in time to allow my client to review the document carefully on Sunday and approve. The final files were sent to the printer first thing on Monday morning meeting the deadline. I don't like to work at such a frantic pace and like to keep my weekends work-free, but sometimes it is necessary to do what is required in order to meet a deadline. I know my client appreciates it.

Luckily, there are two days to a weekend and I was caught up with other design projects. I took full advantage of a beautiful Sunday. Our nights are still in the 30s, so I began the morning doing inside chores until it warmed up. I potted up some tomatoes:



I sorted through the storage potatoes to see what could be planted. I ended up with 5 pounds of Dark Red Norland and 7 pounds of Kennebec plus set some aside that were still good for eating:



Once it warmed up a bit, K and I worked on the coop for a while. It is progressing quite well considering I have never constructed anything in my life. I am pretty proud of our progress so far:



Later in the afternoon, I sifted and added compost to the potato bed, worked it in, and began planting potatoes until I ran out of steam. The rest will be planted later this week then the bed will be layered with a soaking hose and mulched with hay or straw:



In just a short time the grass greened up and is in need of its first mow, the tree buds are beginning to unfold, and the black flies have made their appearance. The weather is supposed to be beautiful all week and I am looking forward to getting the garden into shape for the growing season.


12 comments:

  1. Oh-oh, now you're going to be hooked on building projects. It only takes one success to get you wanting to build more...and more...and more!

    It will feel good to finally be able to get out in the sunshine and begin gardening in earnest. Last night was supposed to be our final freeze. I certainly hope so, Mother Nature has been teasing me for the past couple of weeks.

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    1. It was kind of fun to build something together. We took our time and discussed each step until we decided on the best approach. Then we went to work. It's nice to know we can accomplish a building goal together. I hope your weather warms up soon,

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  2. The coop is looking good. I remember as a child helping my dad build a turkey house. We never had chickens. Ducks, geese, and turkey. You would think they would go for the egg laying ones, but they never did.

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    1. You must have fond memories of building the turkey house with your dad. My father remembers his family raising turkeys in their back yard when he was a child. Although I think they had chickens too. I seem to remember some stories told by my Great Aunt.

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  3. The chicken coop is looking great. Those are gonna be some happy chickens as nice as it looks. I don't think my first apartment was that big. ;)

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    1. The hen house is roughly 4x8 feet. The general rule is 2-4 square feet per chicken. From what I have read, egg production usually begins to decrease after 2 years. Often times people will cull the non-producers. I hope to keep them around for pest control and compost. This will allow some extra room to add to the flock in the future to keep our egg production going.

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  4. Coop looks good! Sounds as though you got a lot done, both in and out.

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    1. Thanks! It was nice to get so much accomplished, but there is so much more to do. This week has been crazy busy as well.

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  5. Coop is looking good. Are your black flies the same as buffalo gnats? That's what the Purdue extension calls them. I read that when the water temperature gets above 70 F they go away. They are an absolute plague when at their worst.

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    1. I believe our black flies are closely related if not the same as buffalo gnats. The usually arrive in spring then go away for most of the summer. Black Flies are often referred to as the unofficial Maine state bird. LOL!

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  6. I love how high up the coop is on stilts - looks like you're ready for a flood! ;-)

    I don't know what sort of black flies we have compared to yours, but I've had to mow three times so far this spring and each time I've had at least one annoying fly attacking me.

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    1. The coop is 2-feet off the ground. Hopefully it will be easy to sweep out the litter into a wheelbarrow. Plus the extra space underneath can be used as a shady area for the hens.

      The black files mentioned are described here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_fly
      These are about 1/16-inches. Just large enough to be irritating by flying around. When they bite, it feels much like a mosquito bite.

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