Saturday, July 6, 2013

Weekly Garden Musings: July 6, 2013

Early this morning before the sun rose above the trees I was in the garden weeding. You could feel the air thicken as the sun's rays hit the dew-covered foliage. It has been hot and humid over the last several days and I knew once the sun reached the garden, it would be too uncomfortable to continue working.

I worked from one raised bed to the next. The weeds were easy to pull from the damp soil. I finished four raised beds before it became too hot to continue. I will resume again in the evening when the sun begins to set.

Thinking of the meals ahead, I harvested some green onions, beet green thinnings, and herbs before I retreated inside to air conditioned comfort. Because of the heat, meals will be simple ones that are grilled with salad or stir-fried.

We've had a lot of rain over the past week, So much so that much of the state was under a flood watch. We've even broke the rainfall record for June set in 2009. That was also the year without a tomato harvest as devastating late blight ravaged gardens up and down the east coast that year. (apsnet.org "The 2009 Late Blight Pandemic in Eastern USA").

Last week's rain saturated the landscape, the limbs of the apple trees were heavy and draped into the driveway, the grass was in desperate need of mowing, and in the weeds made a foothold in the garden. Luckily, the basement didn't flood and there is no blight in the garden so far.

Once the rain stopped and the sun, heat, and humidity settled in, the garden responded:

The First Tomatoes 

Zucchini

Cucumber
Pole Beans Climbing Their Trellis

The peppers look pretty stressed out and some of the lower leaves are turning yellow. They are not happy with the crazy weather that has seesawed between damp and cold and hot and humid. In addition, they are struggling against slug and beetle damage.

Pepper

The lower foliage on the garlic has begun to yellow. It won't be long until they are ready to harvest:

Garlic Should Be Ready Soon

During the week, we took advantage of a break in the rain to replace some of the trellises in the garden; the others were reinforced to help them through this growing season. They will require replacement next year. Trellis netting was added to all the indeterminate tomato beds just in time for the tomatoes to need support.

Two New Trellises on the Raised Beds
Pests: Joining the slug population this week are a few Colorado Potato Beetles and the ever-destructive Japanese Beetles.

6 comments:

  1. Your garden looks great! I'm sure your peppers will pull through. My poor eggplants are suffering from insect damage. They are still growing though.

    This humid weather is just too much for me! The Italian and I are planning to go to the plots very early tomorrow morning to weed, weed whack and harvest. I was there this morning at 9 this morning and it was too much. The plots look like a jungle!

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    1. My eggplants seem to have recovered from flea beetle damage. I hope the peppers do too. The weather has been awful with either constant rain or the high humid heat.

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  2. Sorry about the typo....I'm going to blame it on the heat!

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  3. I have not been able to bring myself to mow in this heat and humidity. I find myself fantasizing about getting the farmer who has been haying in the field that adjoins the back of my property to bring his equipment by and cut my grass-turning-into-hay-fields. -Jean

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    1. It was difficult to find a good window to get the mowing completed. With the humidity level so high, the grass is still wet late into the mornings, the days are too hot, and thunderstorms have been popping up in the evenings.

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  4. We're just the opposite now - very dry. It's never perfect is it?

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